Go West

It was in 1925 when Buster Keaton found himself another leading lady to be in his newest feature film Go West. With big brown eyes, dark eyelashes, golden-red hair, a sweet demeanor, wet nose, four legs, and a tail, she was the perfect pick. Confused? Meet Brown Eyes, the lovable Jersey cow!

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Safety Last!

The image of Harold Lloyd dangling from the arm of a clock is one that made me become more aware of the world of silent cinema. I had seen it long before I even got around to watching the film, yet it always struck a fascination in me. Just how did he do that? Since then, I’ve acquired a little more Silent Era knowledge, but the personal sense of awe over how something so visually enchanting was captured onto nitrate had never come close to vanishing.

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The Saphead

Released in 1920, The Saphead places the spotlight on Buster Keaton in his first feature-length starring role as Bertie Van Alstyne—of which we can thank Douglas Fairbanks for his recommendation. Without trying to spoil anything, the basic backbone of the plot simply goes as follows: Bertie is in love with Agnes (Beulah Booker) and does whatever he can to impress her, only to find out that he hardly had to do anything at all. However, it isn’t long before his brother-in-law steps in to ruin their marital plans. Keaton’s performance in The Saphead would also go on to earn him cinematic credibility in the wake of his upcoming short films.

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